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Situated in the stunning Oxfordshire countryside on the banks of The River Cherwell and Thames and when in the vicinity of Oxford the Thames is famously known as the Isis. Oxford was first occupied in Saxon times when it was known as "OxenaRfoda" meaning Ford of the Ox.

The University of Oxford was first mentioned in the 12th century and these colleges were established at a time when Europeans were starting to translate the writings of Greek philosophers. The poet Matthew Arnold referred to Oxford as the "city of dreaming spires". At the Iffley Road runing track on 6 May 1954 Roger Bannister a medical student ran the first authenticated four minute mile.

The picturesque Oxford Canal meanders slowly through 77 miles of classic scenery and is one of England's most peaceful waterways running lazily through the countryside from Oxford to Coventry.

The Oxford University Museum of Natural History houses the University's scientific collections and specimens which have been collected over of the last three centuries. Among the most famous features are the Oxfordshire dinosaurs and the dodo. The Museum's overall mission is to preserve and exhibit the University's collections and to promote research, teaching, and public education.

Christ Church Cathedral stands on the site of an ancient Saxon Church founded in the 8th century by Saint Frideswide the Patron Saint of Oxford. View the stained glass window in the Lucy Chapel which dates from 1320 and depicts the martyrdom of Thomas Becket the then Archbishop of Canterbury.

Built during 1913 and 1914 and located in New College Lane is the Hertford Bridge. Known locally as The Bridge of Sighs because of its similarity to the famous bridge in Venice. Hertford Bridge was never intended to be a replica of the Venetian bridge and bears more resemblance to the Rialto Bridge. The bridge links together the Old and New Quadrangles of the Hertford College.

The Morse TV series which was based on the award-winning novels by Colin Dexter and first shown in 1987 brought to the world an Oxford not seen before. Take a guided tour through familiar scenes of the streets and buildings of the city.

The Covered Market was created in 1772 to rid Oxford’s streets of their untidy and unsavoury stalls. The market is now a colourful collection of small shops selling everything from hand-made hats and gifts to Oxford sausages. Explore the smaller streets including Little Clarendon Street, Turl Street, Golden Cross and Gloucester Green all of which offer one-off gift shops, boutiques and jewellers. Broad Street is home to the world famous bookshop Blackwells which was founded in 1879 by Benjamin Henry Blackwell. For a great place to eat visit the infamous Oxford Prison which is now home to an exciting ranges of restaurants and cafés.